COMMON RUIN

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Archive for the tag “philosophy”

Council Communism vs. Anarcho-Capitalism Debate: Property and Exploitation

voe-debate

Is private property defensible? Can stateless capitalism be exploitative?

The first part of my debate with Charles Owen was recently released on The Value of Everything podcast, and has since been edited by my comrades at the Friedrich Engels Institute for Scientific Socialist Research. Before beginning this episode, however, I recommend listening to our preliminary discussion, wherein Charles and I briefly outline our respective political philosophies.

In this part of the series, we debate the legitimacy of private property and discuss whether or not wage labor is an exploitative practice. The second part of our series will be recorded in the coming weeks and released sometime thereafter.

If this exchange should elicit any questions you’d like to put forward, please feel free to comment below and I’ll do my utmost to provide a swift reply.

Click here to download or stream the recording via SoundCloud.

Debate Update

communist-insurrection

The great debate is near…

I just wanted to inform those who have been following the dialog series I’ve been engaged in with Charles Owen of The Value of Everything podcast that our debate on council communism and cybernetic anarcho-capitalism will hopefully be recorded sometime in early October. Unexpected events in my personal life have delayed things, but I’m confident I’ll be able to make time for the discussion very soon.

I’d also like to vow to my comrades that I shall competently defend, and persuasively advance, our political philosophy. Charles is an honorable adversary, so I know we’ll be provided a fair hearing.

The Value of Everything: The Logic of Cybernetic Anarcho-Capitalism

VoE103

A modern libertarian vision.

Charles Owen and I switch roles in episode 103 of The Value of Everything, and I conduct an interview with him examining his political philosophy. Charles is a proponent of a capitalistic stateless society, socially organized along voluntaryist ethics (chiefly the non-aggression principle) and economically grounded in a decentralized blockchain network. Those critical of propertarianism can still learn much from his arguments, as the mode of production he advocates differs considerably from conventional models of anarcho-capitalism.

In a forthcoming episode, Charles and I will debate our respective political philosophies, but we hope to continue our dialogue on other topics into the future.

Click here to download episode #103.

Interview on The Value of Everything

The Value of Everything 101

Where are we headed?

Charles Owen and I have recently come into contact with one another and agreed to record a series of dialogues and debates for his thought-provoking podcast The Value of Everything. Charles’s theoretical background is in classical and Austrian economics, and he espouses a libertarian political philosophy which is rather unique in orientation. I encourage everyone to visit his website, subscribe to the show’s YouTube channel, and listen to the catalog of episodes.

In our first exchange, Charles and I conjecture on the future of world affairs. Among other things, we discuss the global economic crisis, the ascent of political populism, and the prospects for social change.

Click here to download the interview. (Please excuse my gaffes and pauses, it’s my  first time being recorded for a podcast.)

Marxism as an Instrument of Bourgeois Ideology: A Reply to Ellerman

Has Marxism contributed to the perpetuation of capitalism?

Saviors of the Bourgeoisie?

My latest paper is a response to David Ellerman’s 2010 “Marxism as a Capitalist Tool,” The Journal of Socio-Economics, Vol. 39, pp. 696-700. I invite those interested in reading it to download the paper either here or on my academia.edu profile.

ABSTRACT:
Has Marxism inadvertently contributed to the perpetuation of the capitalist mode of production? David Ellerman answers in the affirmative. In this paper I endeavor to demonstrate that Ellerman’s position stems from a fundamental misunderstanding of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels’s critique of capital.

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